Restrepo (2010)

, , Leave a comment

Filmmakers Tim Hetherington and Sebastian Junger take their cameras into the trenches for a “day in the life” look at what it’s like to fight in the Korengal Valley, Afghanistan, nicknamed the most dangerous place on earth.

There, a platoon of battle-weary men fight the Taliban, an elusive spectre of an enemy that they rarely actually see. They seem to have little interest in what they’re doing or why they’re doing it; they only come alive immediately after a fire-fight (of which they have at least 3 or 4 a day), when the adrenaline of battle gives them a natural high. The rest of the time they spend going about their more mundane duties, feeling at all times like fish in a barrel.

Late into the film, one of their men is killed in a battle that pretty much all of them agree was one of their worst moments during the whole period. Other men had been killed, but this seems to be one of the first that the men actually see die before their eyes. It has a devastating effect — they collapse into sobs and turn instantly from fighting men into small boys, and our hearts go out to them with compassion and the frustrated regret that they have to live like this while the rest of us go about our cushy existence.

“Restrepo” confirms what a lot of fictional accounts of the War on Terror (or whatever it is we’re calling it now) have suggested: the feelings of determination and vengeance that got us into all of these messy military conflicts have long since given way to depressed resignation. No one is really sure what we’re doing anymore, these soldiers least of all, and watching “Restrepo” didn’t feel much different from watching a documentary about Vietnam.

Watch Restrepo Documentary Trailer.

(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)
 

Leave a Reply